Agency News

DSM Agency is currently not taking on new projects. After 20 years in business, with 90 clients, about 600 deals made (over 100 domestic, 450 translations, 50 subsidiary rights), and 20 interns, I have decided to concentrate on the business we currently have and take a break from adding new clients.  The industry is changing rapidly and I need time to rethink the literary agency business model.  Our family also continues to mourn the loss of my dear brother and his son: http://adventuremagazine.co.nz/tribute-to-marty-and-denali-schmidt/.

All the best,
Doris

In Tribute to Marty & Denali Schmidt

DSM Agency is mourning the tragic loss of world-class climber Marty Schmidt  and his son Denali Schmidt (Doris’s beloved brother and nephew) in an avalanche on the mountain K2. Our hearts go out to their family, friends, and loved ones. We wish them much love and strength during this difficult time.

martydenali

 Marty Schmidt’s Facebook page

Alaskan Adventures, Marty and Denali Schmidt

There have been and will be a number of memorial gatherings including the one described below on August 11th in Bear Valley and the one in the home town of Doris in California in October and the one later this year in New Zealand.

Drinking Water

As seen on nytimes.com:

Four Books Explore Humans’ Relationship With Water

By 
Published: October 7, 2013

Earth, “the blue planet,” has a lot of water. Most of the planet’s surface is covered with it. But less than 5 percent of that water is fresh, and much of that is locked up in ice sheets or inconveniently far underground. And it is not always most abundant where it is most needed.

As a result, we are drawing on underground aquifers faster than they can recharge. And the water we have is often polluted by sewage, industrial waste, parasites and other contaminants that can make “natural” water unsafe to drink.

In short, as James Salzman puts it in “Drinking Water,” one of four new books that dive into our species’ relationship with water, clean supplies have always been the exception, not the norm. As recently as 1900, he writes, 1 in 70 Americans died of a waterborne disease before age 70.

Though he ranges widely, Mr. Salzman, who teaches law and environmental studies at Duke, focuses on what one might call social justice. Access to water may be viscerally regarded as a “right,” but he points out that the best way to ensure a reliable supply of pure water, especially in poor regions, is often to privatize it.