Drinking Water

As seen on nytimes.com:

Four Books Explore Humans’ Relationship With Water

By 
Published: October 7, 2013

Earth, “the blue planet,” has a lot of water. Most of the planet’s surface is covered with it. But less than 5 percent of that water is fresh, and much of that is locked up in ice sheets or inconveniently far underground. And it is not always most abundant where it is most needed.

As a result, we are drawing on underground aquifers faster than they can recharge. And the water we have is often polluted by sewage, industrial waste, parasites and other contaminants that can make “natural” water unsafe to drink.

In short, as James Salzman puts it in “Drinking Water,” one of four new books that dive into our species’ relationship with water, clean supplies have always been the exception, not the norm. As recently as 1900, he writes, 1 in 70 Americans died of a waterborne disease before age 70.

Though he ranges widely, Mr. Salzman, who teaches law and environmental studies at Duke, focuses on what one might call social justice. Access to water may be viscerally regarded as a “right,” but he points out that the best way to ensure a reliable supply of pure water, especially in poor regions, is often to privatize it.

Harry Kraemer, Author of From Values To Action, Gives A TED Talk

Harry Kraemer delivers his four value-based leadership principles at TEDx event organized by Kellogg student. Watch Kraemer’s 15-minute talk starting at the 1:01 mark.

The Personal Business Plan: A Blueprint for Running Your Life

Stephen Bruyant-Langer explains the logic behind his recently released book, The Personal Business Plan: A Blueprint for Running Your Life.

 

As shown on thepersonalbusinessplan.com: